Gyula Tóth Video Lecture: The Trap of False History 10 Years On (with English subtitles)

The original article titled “The Trap of False History” that was published on this site was the work of Gyula Tóth translated to English from the original Hungarian, and concerned Heribert Illig’s and Uwe Topper’s Phantom Time hypothesis in connection to the accuracy of the Hungarian chronicles. This very recently recorded lecture’s title is “The Sack of Rome, and – The Dark Ages?” and starts off by explaining the problem of the different calendars used in the world before, during and after the Middle Ages. What was the true purpose of inserting 300 years into European historiography? Was it done on purpose? In those crucial years, what significant events took place that were artifically disconnected from their original protagonists and who were these protagonists?

The lecture is subtitled in English and is annotated throughout with crucial information regarding Magyar history, culture, language and mythology to help non-Hungarians to understand the significance of Tóth’s discoveries.

, by Kartavirya This entry was posted in Metahistory. Bookmark the permalink. Post a comment or leave a trackback.

One Comment

  1. John Ford said:

    Just to say thank you for providing the works of Plato. Appreciate your efforts.

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  • Within a nominally Christian world, chivalry upheld without any substantial alterations an Aryan ethics in the following things: (1) upholding the ideal of the hero rather than of the saint, and of the conqueror rather than of the martyr; (2) regarding faithfulness and honor, rather than caritas and humbleness, as the highest virtues; (3) regarding cowardice and dishonor, rather than sin, as the worst possible evil; (4) ignoring or hardly putting into practice the evangelical precepts of not opposing evil and not retaliating against offenses, but rather, methodically punishing unfairness and evil; (5) excluding from its ranks those who followed the Christian precept ‘Thou Shalt Not Kill’ to the letter; and (6) refusing to love one’s enemy and instead fighting him and being magnanimous only after defeating him.

    - Julius Evola, Revolt Against the Modern World, p. 298-99.